What We Do

Our Patients

Many of the people we serve struggle daily to put food on the table, which is why they often ignore medical problems until they become life threatening. Infant and maternal mortality in Sololá (the department where the Hospitalito is located) is among the highest in the Americas. Sixty-seven (67) percent of Maya children suffer from chronic malnutrition.

In the past, members of the community had to travel to the national hospital in Sololá, an arduous two hour trip – assuming that roads were passable and free from mudslides and debris. Even so, few or none of the staff there speak Tz’utujil. The long journey could be the difference between life and death for a woman in complicated labor or a very sick child. For too long, many local residents choose to remain at home and die rather than make the difficult journey.

Hospitalito Atitlán has provided the community with access to quality healthcare from professionals who speak their language. Committed to making services affordable to everyone, our social workers evaluate patient and family resources and, if needed, provide free medical care for those with limited resources.

The health problems in the Atitlán area reflect those found in other poverty-stricken areas. Children suffer from significant respiratory and diarrheal illnesses as well as the chronic effects of malnutrition. Obstetrical issues are often complex with high levels of pre-eclampsia. Social issues impact the health of both mothers and their babies. Adults suffer from diabetes, hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) caused by open cook fires at home.

Our Services

Hospitalito Atitlán has outpatient clinic weekdays from 8:30 – 5:00 pm (or whenever the last patient is seen). It is very difficult to get patients to come in unless they are sick, so screening and identification of high-risk individuals is done during every visit.

Medical staff sees adults and children in five exam rooms, providing acute/urgent care and preventive and treatment services for a wide range of conditions.

The Hospitalito provides a full-range of emergency and inpatient services, as well as obstetrical care.

Patient Donation

• Clinic visit Q25 (US $3.50)
• Specialist clinic consultation Q50 (US $7.00)
• Emergency room admission Q50 (US $7.00)
• X-ray Q75 (US $10.00)

Department of Social Work staff determines patient discount eligibility.

• Foreigners/tourists pay double these fees.

Our Building

Hospitalito Atitlán is 25,000 square feet and serves over 1,000 patients a month. It is located on the road between San Lucas Tolimán and Santiago Atitlán. This new facility became a reality when the first floor opened in November 2010, followed by the second floor in December 2011.

Hospital Facilities

  • Four emergency bays
  • Four labor and delivery beds
  • Five patient consultation rooms
  • Two chair dental clinic
  • A surgical suite with two operating rooms
  • Pre- and post-op recovery
  • Two physician on-call rooms
  • Sixteen (16) inpatient beds
  • Elevator for handicapped access
  • Pharmacy
  • Laboratory
  • Radiology department
  • Medical library
  • Central sterile supply and central supply departments
  • Laundry
  • Kitchen
  • Administrative/development offices

The building is graced with natural spaces, including a maternity garden with private walkway and a medicinal plant garden.

Energy Efficiency

Hospitalito Atitlán is energy efficient. Solar water heaters are used, and 700 solar panels reduce electrical costs. In addition, the facility has an oxygen generator, water purification system, and battery and generator backup for the electrical system.

Staff

We have more than 50 employees including physicians, nurses, allied health professionals and administrative staff. Volunteer medical personnel from around the world complement existing personnel, providing added clinical and research expertise.

Since more than 60 percent of our patients speak only the local Mayan dialect, Hospitalito staff work with patients and medical volunteers, translating between Tz’utujil and Spanish.